Come to Me by Laura Davis

Donna Fawcett of London, Ontario recommends Come to Me by Laura Davis.

 laura-davis-come-to-me

Name of publisher: Xulon press

Genre: Novel

About the book:
This book is Mary’s story. Laura Davis puts humanity into the story of Jesus through his mother’s eyes. We see her flaws and her gifts; her humanity and her submission to the spirit. This story brings the characters into our lives and hearts. 

How did you find out about the book?
I reviewed it for my website book reviews.

What did you like about it?
I liked seeing Mary as a person–beyond the scriptural portrayal. I liked the fact that she wasn’t a perfect person. She was just like me.

Who do you think would most benefit from reading this book?
Anyone old enough to read would benefit.

Where can others find it?  
Laura Davis’ website

Any other comments? 
I love reading novels of Biblical stories. No one has ever done one quite like this. It was brave of Laura to try it and she pulled it off well.

 

Thanks, Donna. I also enjoyed reading this novel and seeing Mary as a person, not just the Mother of God.

 

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2 thoughts on “Come to Me by Laura Davis

  1. Not just the Mother of God. Oh, Kim, Kim!

    As you know, the Catholic Church holds that Mary was without flaws in her character, having been conceived without the stain of Original Sin. This does not make the Blessed Virgin less interesting, any more than Protestants (or other Christians) need their mental image of a sinless Jesus spiced up by novelists who make him have an affair with Mary Magdalene.

    Now, I haven’t read Laura’s book, and I’m also confident she isn’t setting out to offend anyone, but I would encourage anyone who is drawn to the novel to reflect upon what it would mean for salvation history if the Catholic claims about Mary are actually true.

    “Sinning does not make one human. On the contrary, it is when man is without sin that he is most fully what God intends him to be.”
    http://www.catholic.com/library/Immaculate_Conception_and_Assum.asp

  2. I’m confused by the statement “I would encourage anyone who is drawn to the novel to reflect upon what it would mean for salvation history if the Catholic claims about Mary are actually true.” What would it mean if the Catholic claims are true, or false for that matter? Jesus’, death and resurrection would still be the same. His sacrifice for our sins would still be the same. And so the essence of “salvation history” would remain the same. Or did I miss the point?

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